A fiery rant about workplace etiquette during flu season is going … viral.

Former Obama speechwriter Jon Lovett has a problem with how we handle flu season in the U.S.

During a recent taping of his podcast, “Lovett or Leave It,” Lovett touched on a topic we’re not actually hearing a whole lot about: the current flu epidemic. The flu — which experts say is the worst in nearly a decade and has already racked up a modest body count — is an issue that’s not getting much attention.

Enter Crooked Media co-founder Lovett. He’s fired up about this year’s flu, and we should all should hear him out. (Just a warning: some NSFW language.)

If you are sick, do not go to work. This is how you spread germs.

“You show up at work and you’re sick — fuck you, ok?” he says, bluntly. “If you have a job with paid sick leave and you can work at home, you work at home. If you wake up achy and with a fever, don’t go to the office and see how it goes. You’re going to give people the fucking flu.”

He’s totally right. Staying home from work (or from school) when you’re sick is actually the first thing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests. In fact, they take it a step further, suggesting you stay home even if you’re not yet sick, but someone else in your household is.

Other important reminders include covering coughs and sneezes, washing your hands, and wearing a mask if you’re out in public. (Yes, I know it can look goofy as hell, but it’s for the greater good, people.)

Americans are weird when it comes to work. We’ve been taught to tough it out and that showing up when we’re sick is part of being a team player.

It needs to change, and we can start with how we praise kids for perfect attendance at school. Going to school or work when you’re sick is actually a profoundly selfish thing to do. Unless you’re Michael Jordan hopping in a time machine to drop 38 points on the Utah Jazz in the 1997 NBA Finals, you need to stay in bed. As only he can, Lovett explains:

“You going is about proving you’re the kind of person who powers through. It’s not about being a team player, it’s about you, and it’s a weird performance, and people shouldn’t go to work sick. It’s bullshit. It’s treated like, ‘Oh yeah, what a tough person.’ Fuck you. Go home. You are a contagious thing. Your mucous membranes don’t know how much you care about your work. They don’t give a shit.”

It’s time we got with the rest of the world and implemented mandatory paid sick leave.

Many people living paycheck-to-paycheck or working an hourly, low-wage job often don’t have the ability to call in sick. Many countries — the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Mexico, and many, many more — mandate that employers offer their workers paid time off for sickness, but not here in the U.S.

The CDC (funded by the federal government) recommends that individuals do something that the federal government won’t act on. If the government saw public health issues as a true priority, they’d enact policies that would allow people — especially hourly workers, some of whom might be handling your food — to take time off when they need it. A few states have taken it upon themselves to require companies to offer paid time off, and several companies have decided it’s a benefit worth offering all employees, but Congress should pass a bill making it a requirement nationwide.

“We never cover cause and effect,” Lovett says, referring to why a wealthy country like the U.S. gets hammered by diseases year after year. “We never talk about the system.”

Watch Lovett’s inspired, fiery rant below.

For more information on what you can do to help prevent the spread of the flu, visit the CDC’s website (and, seriously, get a flu shot).

Don’t show up for work sick. It’s bullshit.

“Showing up to work sick is not about being a team player, it’s about you, and it’s a weird performance… Fuck you, go home”

http://go.crooked.com/mVWX8K

Posted by Lovett or Leave It on Friday, January 26, 2018

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/a-fiery-rant-about-workplace-etiquette-during-flu-season-is-going-viral

A mom told her OB she might have postpartum depression. Then they called the cops.

Jessica Porten recently visited her doctor four months after giving birth to her daughter, Kira. She wasn’t feeling quite like herself.

She had been dealing with overwhelming sadness and fits of anger, which she knew was likely stemming from a case of postpartum depression.

In a Facebook post, Porten recounts the story of that appointment.

“I tell them I have a very strong support system at home, so although I would never hurt myself or my baby,” she writes. “I’m having violent thoughts and I need medication and therapy to get through this.”

In other words, she went to her doctor to ask for help for an extremely normal and treatable issue that affects an estimated 1 million women in the U.S. each year in one form or another.

But instead of getting help, as Porten tells it, the office did something pretty unexpected: They called the police.

Because of her admission to “violent thoughts,” staff wanted the police to escort Porten to the ER for evaluation.

The cops, according to Porten, were skeptical of the need for their presence when they arrived and allowed her to drive herself to the hospital.

But the ordeal continued.

“We arrive at the ER and I’m checked in, triaged, blood drawn. I am assigned a security guard to babysit me,” she writes.

She says she waited for over an hour to get a room, all while wrangling her months-old baby. After some brief tests, a lot of waiting, and a super-short interview with a social worker, she was deemed mentally fit enough to be discharged.

Porten and her 4-month-old didn’t leave the hospital until after midnight.

The worst part? Porten never got the help she asked for.

In addition to the undue stress and wasted time, Porten left the hospital without having received any medical help whatsoever.

“Not once during all of this has a doctor laid eyes on me,” she writes. “Not once. Not even before they decided to call the cops on me.”

Porten says that, for all her time and effort, she received some papers and pamphlets and was sent on her way.

“I’m still processing all of the emotions that are coming with being treated this way. I’m not exactly sure what to do here. I will say I am deeply hurt and upset, and above all angry and disgusted and disappointed by how this whole thing went down.”

She also points out that if she had been a woman of color, her ordeal probably would have been even more drawn out and traumatic.

You can read her full story in the now-viral Facebook post below:

#Action4Jessica #4Bills4CAMoms
Please read the latest updates 🤗

I had a really hard time deciding whether I should post…

Posted by Jessica Porten on Friday, January 19, 2018

Postpartum depression is a serious issue — as is the stigma it carries.

Postpartum depression is common. The condition, and even the scary violent thoughts that sometimes accompany it, may even have an important evolutionary purpose. Some argue that new moms are on high alert for danger and that stress can sometimes visually manifest itself in their thoughts.

But, as with most mental health issues, postpartum depression can carry a lot of shame, embarrassment, and guilt for the women affected by it — leading them to ignore their symptoms instead of seeking help. One study even found that countries that don’t recognize postpartum depression by name actually see women more likely to come forward with their symptoms.

Stories like Porten’s show exactly why many women would rather suffer in silence than be poked, prodded, and treated inhumanely. And of course, not getting proper treatment will only make things wore.

It’s time for a different approach.

It may be a common policy to call the police in the interest of the child’s safety. But a policy that better addresses the mother’s concerns and gets her the help she needs, without being shamed, is definitely a better way to go.

To get there, we need to help more honest and brave women feel comfortable coming forward about the aspects of postpartum depression that are hard to talk about. And we all need to better educate ourselves on the complexities of mental health issues and, more importantly, the human beings behind them.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/a-mom-told-her-ob-she-might-have-postpartum-depression-then-they-called-the-cops

Saying depression is a ‘choice’ only makes things worse. Allow Andy Richter to explain.

Photo by Mike Windle/Getty Images for SiriusXM.

Depression is not a choice, and anyone who says otherwise is just plain wrong.

After reading a tweet that simply said, “Depression is a choice,” actor, writer, and comedian Andy Richter was so angry that he “pulled over after school drop-off” to vent on Twitter about what it’s like to live with depression and be constantly bombarded with unhelpful “advice” that so often amounts to little more than blame for those living with it.

“[Depression] varies in strength from a casual unresolvable suspicion that I will never find the joy that others do in a sunset, to the feeling that being dead might be a respite and a kindness,” he tweeted, highlighting how difficult the hazy experience of living with depression can be to describe.

He also draws an important distinction between having good things in one’s life — such as a great family and successful career — and being dealt a bad hand when it came to the genetic lottery of depression, a feeling he describes as “an ever-present amorphous sadness.”

“My life is full. I am lucky,” he tweeted. “And I will still reach the end of my life having walked through most of it with an emotional limp. I do not wallow in self-pity. No one did this to me. It is just how it is. I am just unlucky.”

Saying things like “depression is a choice” is not only wrong, it also keeps people from seeking the help they need.

Depression is really common. In fact, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, an estimated 16.1 million U.S. adults 18 or older experienced at least one major depressive episode in 2015, accounting for 6.7% of all adults in the country.

Left untreated, depression can lead to all matters of problems, ranging from an inability to focus on work, all the way up to suicide — making the stigma surrounding treatment that much more frustrating.

Sadly, studies have shown that there are still significant segments of the population that view depression and mental illness as a form of weakness. In turn, that attitude reflects on back the person dealing with depression, making them feel embarrassed to seek treatment.

“If you are unburdened by depression, real true depression, count yourself lucky,” Richter wrote.

“Keep your quick fixes to yourself. This is the kind of bullshit that kills people. Learn, then speak. Or just be lucky and quiet,” he wrapped his thoughts.

The way we fight stigma is by using our voices to let the world know we exist. Today, Andy Richter did just that.

If you or someone you love is struggling with depression, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 or visit their website for more information.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/saying-depression-is-a-choice-only-makes-things-worse-allow-andy-richter-to-explain